Fraud Protection and Identity Theft


Avoid Becoming a Victim of Fraud and Identity Theft:

  • –  Keep your address and telephone number current with First Volunteer Bank and other creditors, even if you do not have a balance.  This will make it easier to reach you quickly if there is  an unauthorized attempt to obtain credit in your name.
  • –  Go paperless – online statements cannot be lost in the mail or stolen out of your mailbox.
  • –  Notify First Volunteer Bank if you do not receive a statement on time to make sure the address has not been changed or your statement has not been stolen from your mailbox or lost in the  mail.
  • –  Do not ignore address change notifications.  If you receive an address change notification and you did not change your address, notify the institution immediately.  This may be an attempt  to take over your account and divert statements or other account information.
  • –  Do not ignore collection calls for debts you do not owe.  If you do not have a loan or account with a creditor, an identity thief may have used your name and personal information.
  • –  If returning a collection call from a creditor you do not owe, contact the company using a telephone number or website you know to be genuine instead of calling the number left on the  message.  This will allow you to verify information with the actual creditor.
  • –  Accept and return calls from First Volunteer Bank as soon as possible regarding questions about a recent transaction.  This will help us establish whether the transaction is legitimate.
  • –  Never give out your personal financial information in response to an unsolicited phone call, fax or e-mail, no matter how official it may seem.
  • –  Check your credit card and bank account statements regularly and look for unauthorized transactions, even small ones.  Some thieves hope small transactions will go unnoticed.  Report  discrepancies immediately.
  • –  Shred private documents such as receipts, applications, bank statements, financial documents, pre-approved offers, etc. 
  • –  Do not carry documents like Social Security card, passport or birth certificate except when necessary.
  • –  Limit the number of credit cards you carry.
  • –  Keep a record of all credit and debit card numbers in a secure place and cancel the card as soon as you suspect that it is missing or has been misused.

Risk Office

Risk Office is a tool used by First Volunteer Bank to assist in protecting our cardholder customers from fraud.

Receiving a call from The Risk Office does not mean that fraud has been detected on your account. It may simply be that you have initiated a transaction that triggered a high score alert, such as an out of area or large dollar transaction.

Please contact your Branch or the Customer Care Center if you will be traveling, making a large dollar purchase, or placing online or phone orders with your debit card.

RISK OFFICE CALLS

Calls may come from any of the following #’s:

866-750-9107

800-279-2674

877-253-8964

Or list a Call Back # of 800-262-2024

*Calls are automated, but customers can always opt to speak with a person.

*The Caller will identify themselves as “First Volunteer Bank”.

*Caller will ask for the last 4 digits of the customer’s SSN in order to verify that they have reached the correct customer (they will never ask for the card #).

*The Caller will inquire on the transaction which the alert identified as possible fraud, as well as several prior transactions.

*If any of the identified transactions are identified as fraudulent, the debit card will immediately be disabled and the customer will be required to call or stop by their local branch for assistance in receiving a new card. The customer will also be assisted in filing a Dispute on any fraudulent items that have occurred.

*If the transactions are identified as legitimate and not as fraud, the customer may still need to contact the bank for assistance in allowing any large dollar or out of area transactions to be completed.

*If you are ever unsure about a caller asking about your accounts with First Volunteer Bank, please do not provide any information and contact your branch or the customer care center directly at 423-668-4700.

 

Falcon

“Falcon” is a tool used by First Volunteer Bank to assist in protecting our cardholder customers from Credit Card fraud.

Receiving a call from Falcon does not mean that fraud has been detected on your account. It may simply be that you have initiated a transaction that triggered an alert, and before the transaction can be completed verification is needed.

*The Caller will identify themselves“Falcon fraud Monitoring Service, calling on behalf of First Volunteer Bank”.

*The Caller will never ask for your credit card number. 

*The Customer should always expect to be contacted with a Case Number for reference.

*The Caller will inquire on the transaction which the alert identified as possible fraud, andpossibly prior transactions conducted.

*If any of the identified transactions are identified as fraudulent, the credit card will immediately be disabled and the customer will be required to call or stop by their local branch for assistance in receiving a new card. The customer will also be assisted in filing a Dispute on any fraudulent items that have occurred.

*If you are ever unsure about a Caller asking about your accounts with First Volunteer Bank, please do not provide any information and contact your branch or the customer care center directly at 423-668-4700.

Common Ways Identity Theft Happens:

  • –  Dumpster Diving – they rummage through trash looking for bills or other paper with your personal information on it.
  • –  Skimming – they steal credit/debit card numbers by using a special device when processing your card.
  • –  Phishing – they pretend to be financial institutions or companies and send spam or pop-up messages to get you to reveal your personal information.
  • –  Lottery Scams.
  • –  Spoofing websites.
  • –  Changing your address – they divert your billing statements to another location by completing a “change of address” form.
  • –  Old-fashioned stealing – they steal wallets and purses; mail, including bank and credit card statements; pre-approved credit offers; and new checks or tax information.  –  They steal personnel records from their employers, or bribe employees who have access.
  • –  Information posted on personal or social networking websites.

 

Information Needed to Steal Your Identity:

Most Important

  • –  Name
  • –  Address
  • –  Social Security Number
  • –  Telephone Number
  • –  Mother’s Maiden Name
  • –  Employment

Effective for Social Engineering

  • –  Past Addresses
  • –  Financial Account Numbers
  • –  Children’s Names
  • –  Family Information

 

Signs of Identity Theft:

  • –  Missing mail or a significant reduction in the amount of mail you receive.
  • –  Calls from a collection agency that you do not recognize.
  • –  Unusual transactions on your account statements or credit reports.
  • –  New credit cards in the mail for which you have not applied.
  • –  Unexpected declines for loan, mortgage or credit applications, despite your good credit.

 

Check List for Victims of Identity Theft:

  • –  Keep a record of all communications and copies of correspondence to law enforcement, credit bureaus, banks, and other agencies.
  • –  File a police report.
  • –  Contact your bank.
  • –  Report lost or stolen checks immediately.
  • –  Check post office for unauthorized change of address requests.
  • –  If regular bills have failed to reach you, contact the company to find out why.
  • –  Notify the 3 credit bureaus.
  • –  Place a fraud alert statement on your credit report.
  • –  Request free credit reports from all 3 credit bureaus.

 

Identity Theft Kit is available at:

http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/pdf-0009-taking-charge.pdf